Canopic Jar of Tjuyu

This is one of the canopic jars belonging to a woman called Tjuyu made out of Egyptian alabaster with a small gold coffinette inside in which her mummified internal organ was placed. I think it may be the one that contained her intestines, as I think it mentions the deity Serket.

She was married to a man called Yuya, and they were the parents of Tiye who was the Great Royal Wife of Amenhotep III and mother of Akhenaten. Their tomb was in the Valley of the Kings, KV46, and was discovered robbed but still with many of its grave goods in 1905.

I always find the alabaster objects from Ancient Egypt eye-catching, particularly when the inscriptions are picked out in ink like this one is. It’s something about the juxtaposition of the creamy rounded stone that looks almost soft, and the crisp neat text on it.

Canopic Jar of Tjuyu. From KV46, Valley of the Kings, Thebes. New Kingdom, Dynasty 18, reign of Amenhotep III, c. 1391-1353 BCE. Acc. No.: JE 95244

This is now in the Cairo Museum with the rest of the contents of their tomb (acc. no. JE95244).

See it on my photo site: https://photos.talesfromthetwolands.org/picture.php?/653/ and go one to the right for a photo of another one of these.

Jigsaw puzzles:
easier: https://www.jigsawplanet.com/?rc=play&pid=0b58f08ff52c
harder: https://www.jigsawplanet.com/?rc=play&pid=342823541eb8

Canopic Jars Belonging to Senebtisi

These canopic jars come from a place whose modern name is Harageh, near the more famous site of Lahun (where the Pyramid of Senwosret II was built). They are (roughly) contemporary with this pyramid, as they date to the 12th Dynasty (nearly 4000 years ago).

Each of them once held one of the mummified internal organs of a woman called Senebtisi, preserving them so they were there for her in the afterlife. The organs were buried separately for practical reasons – it’s easier to dry everything if the internal organs are removed first.

Each of the organs was under the protection of a particular one of the four Sons of Horus. The inscriptions on the front of the jars not only name the deceased but also the god who is asked to protect the contents of each jar.

Canopic Jars Belonging to Senebtisi. From tomb 92, Harageh. Middle Kingdom, Dynasty 12, c. 1938-1759 BCE. Acc. No.s: 14.662, 14.663, 14.664, 14.665

They are now in the Brooklyn Museum (acc. no.s: 14.662, 14.663, 14.664, 14.665).

See the photo on my photo site: https://photos.talesfromthetwolands.org/picture.php?/58/

And I once gave a 10 minute presentation on the subject to the Essex Egyptology Group: https://www.facebook.com/margaret.l.patterson/videos/10154572478301916

Jigsaw puzzles:
easier: https://www.jigsawplanet.com/?rc=play&pid=3b72a0348bdf
harder: https://www.jigsawplanet.com/?rc=play&pid=23af4a39a7b6

Jar Lid in Shape of a Human Head

This little head roughly 10cm in each dimension is flat on its underside. That means that it was probably a jar lid, likely for a canopic jar. Sadly it is one of the many ancient Egyptian objects which has no information on where it was found so we can’t know for sure what it is.

The Brooklyn Museum (where it now is, acc. no.: 87.78) dates it to the middle of the 12th Dynasty (c. 1850 BCE) on stylistic grounds – mostly based on the shape of the face and facial features. The museum also references the air of serenity that it has as a diagnostic feature.

Jar Lid in the Shape of a Human Head. Probably from a canopic jar. Provenance unknown. Middle Kingdom, mid-Dynasty 12, reign of Amenemhat II or Senwosret II, c. 1876-1837 BCE. Acc. No.: 87.78

See it on my photo site: https://photos.talesfromthetwolands.org/picture.php?/306/

Jigsaw puzzles:
easier: https://www.jigsawplanet.com/?rc=play&pid=22115796f801
harder: https://www.jigsawplanet.com/?rc=play&pid=0275de5ff345